Wire Rope Slings

Wire Rope Slings

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11-1-1

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11-2-2

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15-1-9

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12-9-2

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12-9-3

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12-9-3L

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12-9-3SL

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14-9-2

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14-9-3

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14-9-3L

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14-9-3SL

  • West-Grip wire rope slings (a Western Sling Company Brand) are fabricated from extra improved plow steel (EIPS) which is a tough, durable steel, combining great strength with high resistance to fatigue.
  • All West-Grip wire rope slings have an independent wire rope core (IWRC) which has a superior resistance to crushing and distortion.
  • Eyes are formed using a flemish eye splice and swaged sleeve.
  • Tagged per A.S.M.E. B30.9 specifications.
  • All sling assemblies with master links will have thimble eyes on the master links.

Operating Practices for Wire Rope Slings


Warning

  • Can fail if damaged, misused, or overloaded.
  • Inspect before use.
  • Use only if trained.
  • Observe rated load.
  • Avoid sharp edges.
  • Death or injury can occur from improper use or care.

Wire Rope Slings Instructions for Care, Use, Inspection and Repair

Care:

  • Store in a clean, dry place and protect from mechanical damage, extreme heat, corrosion, or kinking.
  • Maintain lubricated condition.

Use:

  • Check weight of load.
  • Check sling rated load for type of lift, angle of loading (see Load Angle Chart).
  • Sling shall always be protected from being cut by sharp corners, sharp edges, protrusions, or abrasive surfaces.
  • Center load on base (bowl) of hook unless hook is designed for point loading.
  • Balance load.
  • Avoid jerking load.
  • Maintain load control.
  • Be alert for snagging of load.
  • Avoid dragging sling over rough surfaces and from under the load.
  • Always stand clear of the load.
  • No person allowed beneath the load.
  • Persons are not to ride on sling or load.
  • Avoid knotting, twisting, and kinking the sling.
  • Restrict use to temperatures below 400°f (Fiber Core Wire Rope 180°F) and above -60°F.

Important:

  • A single leg sling with hand tucked splice can unlay and drop the load if allowed to rotate during a lift.
  • Always use a tag line.

Inspection:

  • Before use, look for rope distortion, kinks, cut or broken strands, corrosion, heat damage, birdcaging, or crushing.
  • Look at the end attachments f or cracks, wear or deformation, hooks with twists or a throat opening increase.
  • Look for broken wires: for strand laid and single part slings, no more than 10 broken wires in 1 lay or 5 in 1 strand in 1 lay.
  • For cable laid and braided broken wire inspection criteria, consult the manufacturer.
  • If this wear or damage is present, if rated load tag is missing or illegible, remove from service and replace sling.
  • If an inspection reveals that such wear or damage is present, replace the sling.
  • Frequent inspection is done by the person handling the sling before each use and must include all of the before use items.
  • Periodic inpsections are required at least annually for normal service quarterly or more frequently if in severe service or nearly constant use
  • Periodic inspections are preformed by a designated person who records the observed condition and determines when further use would be hazardous.

Repair:

  • Any hazardous condition disclosed by an inspection shall require replacement of the wire rope.
  • Repair is not an option.

Sling Load Angle

  • Angle factor must be applied to calculate the reduced sling capacity when lifting force is not at 90° to the plane of the load.
  • Multiply angle factor x sling’s vertical rated load to calculate the reduced capacity at that angle.
  • Because of the greatly reduced lifting capacity, use extra care when the sling to load angle, also known as the horizontal angle, is less than 45° and do not make lifts of less than 30°load angle.
  • Example: a sling with adequate capacity could be broken because of increased tension resulting from angles of less than 30°. When possible, use longer slings to minimize angular tension by increasing the angle.

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Sling Load Angle Chart
Angle Factor
90º 1
80º .9848
75º .9659
70º .9397
65º .9063
60º .866
55º .8192
50º .766
45º .7071
40º .6248
35º .5736
30º .5

Sling Choke Angle Effect

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Sling Choke Angle Effect Chart
Angle of Choke Rated Capacity*
Over 120º 100%
90º-120º 87%
60º-89º 74%
30º-59º 62%
0º-29º 49%
*Percent of Sling Rated Capacity in a Choker Hitch

D:d Ratio for Slings

  • Rated capacity of sling shall be decreased when D:d ratio will be smaller than that cited in the latest revision of ASME B30.9 Ch2.
  • Consult the sling manufacturer for specific data or refer to the WRTB Wire Rope Sling User’s Manual.
  • General Note: when D is 25 times the component rope diameter (d) the D:d is expressed as 25:1.

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Wire Rope Sling Definitions

  • AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARD INSTITUTE (A.N.S.I.)
  • AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS (A.S.M.E.)
    • An organization of scientists, engineers and other professionals whose primary function is the development and writing of standards for implementation on a national level.
    • These standards would apply to wire rope slings, web slings, round slings, chain slings, blocks and hardware incorporated within this publication and/or site. ASME B30.9, B30.10 and B30.26 standards apply.
  • OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (O.S.H.A.)
    • A federal regulatory organization with broad national indictment and enforcement powers.
    • One of O.S.H.A.’s primary functions is the enforcement and regulations of those standards written by A.S.M.E., and adopted by O.S.H.A.
    • Their enforcement powers would apply to the use of all items found within this publication and/or site.
    • CFR Titles 29 Part 1926, dated 2011.
  • MINIMUM BREAK STRENGTH
    • The average load or force at which the product fails.
  • NOT A LOAD RATING WORKING LOAD LIMIT (W.L.L.).
    • The maximum load or force which should ever be applied to the product.
    • The long standing federal standards on slings, regulated by O.S.H.A., uses a typical design factor of 5 to 1; that is a resultant working load limit of 20%, of the assembly minimum break strength. (May vary on some products).
    • For example
      • Alloy Chain uses a 4:1 factor.
      • The newly written C.V.S.A. standards on tiedowns enforced by the D.O.T. use a typical design factor of 3:1; that is a resultant working load limit of 33% of the assembly minimum break strength.

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